Ir a contenido


Foto

Sistema Circulatorio - Apuntes -


  • Inicia sesión para responder
62 Respuesta(s) a este Tema

#21 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 18 mayo 2008 - 04:08





smile_031.gif


Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


_________________________________________




Henry Gray (1825–1861). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.







The superior mesenteric artery and its branches.








Loop of small intestine showing distribution of intestinal arteries. (From a preparation by Mr. Hamilton Drummond.) The vessels were injected while the gut was in situ; the gut was then removed, and an x-ray photograph taken.








Arteries of cecum and vermiform process.







The inferior mesenteric artery and its branches.







Sigmoid colon and rectum, showing distribution of branches of inferior mesenteric artery and their anastomoses. (From a preparation by Mr. Hamilton Drummond.)







The arteries of the pelvis.




_______________________________________________________







#22 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 19 mayo 2008 - 04:07





smile_031.gif


Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________




Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.



5b. The Common Iliac Arteries

(Aa. Iliacæ Communes)



The abdominal aorta divides, on the left side of the body of the fourth lumbar vertebra, into the two common iliac arteries (Figs. 531, 539). Each is about 5 cm. in length. They diverge from the termination of the aorta, pass downward and lateralward, and divide, opposite the intervertebral fibrocartilage between the last lumbar vertebra and the sacrum, into two branches, the external iliac and hypogastric arteries; the former supplies the lower extremity; the latter, the viscera and parietes of the pelvis.

The right common iliac artery (Fig. 539) is somewhat longer than the left, and passes more obliquely across the body of the last lumbar vertebra. In front of it are the peritoneum, the small intestines, branches of the sympathetic nerves, and, at its point of division, the ureter. Behind, it is separated from the bodies of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebræ, and the intervening fibrocartilage, by the terminations of the two common iliac veins and the commencement of the inferior vena cava. Laterally, it is in relation, above, with the inferior vena cava and the right common iliac vein; and, below, with the Psoas major. Medial to it, above, is the left common iliac vein.

The left common iliac artery is in relation, in front, with the peritoneum, the small intestines, branches of the sympathetic nerves, and the superior hemorrhoidal artery; and is crossed at its point of bifurcation by the ureter. It rests on the bodies of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebræ, and the intervening fibrocartilage. The left common iliac vein lies partly medial to, and partly behind the artery; laterally, the artery is in relation with the Psoas major.



FIG. 531



The abdominal aorta and its branches.





FIG. 539




The arteries of the pelvis.








The arteries of the internal organs of generation of the female, seen from behind. (After Hyrtl.)








Variations in origin and course of obturator artery.









The superficial branches of the internal pudendal artery.








The deeper branches of the internal pudendal artery.








The arteries of the gluteal and posterior femoral regions.






5b. 2. The External Iliac Artery

(A. Iliaca Externa)



The external iliac artery (Fig. 539) is larger than the hypogastric, and passes obliquely downward and lateralward along the medial border of the Psoas major, from the bifurcation of the common iliac to a point beneath the inguinal ligament, midway between the anterior superior spine of the ilium and the symphysis pubis, where it enters the thigh and becomes the femoral artery.


FIG. 539




The arteries of the pelvis.




___________________________________________________




#23 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 21 mayo 2008 - 02:43





smile_031.gif



Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________




Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.




6. The Arteries of the Lower Extremity



The artery which supplies the greater part of the lower extremity is the direct continuation of the external iliac. It runs as a single trunk from the inguinal ligament to the lower border of the Popliteus, where it divides into two branches, the anterior and posterior tibial. The upper part of the main trunk is named the femoral, the lower part the popliteal.

a. The Femoral Artery




FIG. 545




Femoral sheath laid open to show its three compartments.






FIG. 546




Structures passing behind the inguinal ligament.





(A. Femoralis)



The femoral artery (Figs. 549, 550) begins immediately behind the inguinal ligament, midway between the anterior superior spine of the ilium and the symphysis pubis, and passes down the front and medial side of the thigh. It ends at the junction of the middle with the lower third of the thigh, where it passes through an opening in the Adductor magnus to become the popliteal artery.



FIG. 548




Scheme of the femoral artery. (Poirier and Charpy.)





FIG. 549





The femoral triangle (trigonum femorale; Scarpa’s triangle) (Fig. 549) corresponds to the depression seen immediately below the fold of the groin. Its apex is directed downward, and the sides are formed laterally by the medial margin of the Sartorius, medially by the medial margin of the Adductor longus, and above by the inguinal ligament.

The left femoral triangle.






FIG. 550




The femoral artery.





The femoral sheath (crural sheath) (Figs. 545, 546) is formed by a prolongation downward, behind the inguinal ligament, of the fasciæ which line the abdomen, the transversalis fascia being continued down in front of the femoral vessels and the iliac fascia behind them.



FIG. 545




Femoral sheath laid open to show its three compartments.




FIG. 546




Structures passing behind the inguinal ligament.




The femoral ring (Figs. 546, 547) is bounded in front by the inguinal ligament, behind by the Pectineus covered by the pectineal fascia, medially by the crescentic base of the lacunar ligament, and laterally by the fibrous septum on the medial side of the femoral vein.



FIG. 547




The relations of the femoral and abdominal inguinal rings, seen from within the abdomen. Right side.




In the adductor canal (Fig. 550) the femoral artery is more deeply situated, being covered by the integument, the superficial and deep fasciæ, the Sartorius and the fibrous roof of the canal; the saphenous nerve crosses from its lateral to its medial side. Behind the artery are the Adductores longus and magnus; in front and lateral to it is the Vastus medialis. The femoral vein lies posterior to the upper part, and lateral to the lower part of the artery.


FIG. 550




The femoral artery.






6b. The Popliteal Fossa



Boundaries.—

The popliteal fossa (Fig. 551) or space is a lozenge-shaped space, at the back of the knee-joint. Laterally it is bounded by the Biceps femoris above, and by the Plantaris and the lateral head of the Gastrocnemius below; medially it is limited by the Semitendinous and Semimembranosus above, and by the medial head of the Gastrocnemius below. The floor is formed by the popliteal surface of the femur, the oblique popliteal ligament of the knee-joint, the upper end of the tibia, and the fascia covering the Popliteus; the fossa is covered in by the fascia lata.




6c. The Popliteal Artery

(A. Poplitea)



The popliteal artery (Fig. 551) is the continuation of the femoral, and courses through the popliteal fossa. It extends from the opening in the Adductor magnus, at the junction of the middle and lower thirds of the thigh, downward and lateralward to the intercondyloid fossa of the femur, and then vertically downward to the lower border of the Popliteus, where it divides into anterior and posterior tibial arteries.




FIG. 551




The popliteal, posterior tibial, and peroneal arteries.







____________________________________________________________








#24 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 23 mayo 2008 - 01:31



Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________




Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.




6. The Arteries of the Lower Extremity



The Anastomosis Around the Knee-joint (Fig. 552).—







Around and above the patella, and on the contiguous ends of the femur and tibia, is an intricate net-work of vessels forming a superficial and a deep plexus.

FIG. 552

image552.gif


Circumpatellar anastomosis.




6d. The Anterior Tibial Artery

(A. Tibialis Anterior)







The anterior tibial artery (Fig. 553) commences at the bifurcation of the popliteal, at the lower border of the Popliteus, passes forward between the two heads of the Tibialis posterior, and through the aperture above the upper border of the interosseous membrane, to the deep part of the front of the leg: it here lies close to the medial side of the neck of the fibula. It then descends on the anterior surface of the interosseous membrane, gradually approaching the tibia; at the lower part of the leg it lies on this bone, and then on the front of the ankle-joint, where it is more superficial, and becomes the dorsalis pedis.

6e. The Arteria Dorsalis Pedis

(Dorsalis Pedis Artery)






The arteria dorsalis pedis (Fig. 553), the continuation of the anterior tibial, passes forward from the ankle-joint along the tibial side of the dorsum of the foot to the proximal part of the first intermetatarsal space, where it divides into two branches, the first dorsal metatarsal and the deep plantar.

FIG. 553

image553.gif


Anterior tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries.





1F. The Posterior Tibial Artery

(A. Tibialis Posterior)







The posterior tibial artery (Fig. 551) begins at the lower border of the Popliteus, opposite the interval between the tibia and fibula; it extends obliquely downward, and, as it descends, it approaches the tibial side of the leg, lying behind the tibia, and in the lower part of its course is situated midway between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Here it divides beneath the origin of the Adductor hallucis into the medial and lateral plantar arteries.

FIG. 551


image551.gif

The popliteal, posterior tibial, and peroneal arteries.







The medial plantar artery (a. plantaris medialis; internal plantar artery) (Figs. 554 and 555), much smaller than the lateral, passes forward along the medial side of the foot.

FIG. 554

image554.gif


The plantar arteries. Superficial view.






FIG. 555

image555.gif


The plantar arteries. Deep view.



_____________________________________________________________


 

Este tema ha sido editado por Ge. Pe.: 11 junio 2014 - 02:15


#25 Baryonix

Baryonix

    Baryonix

  • Moderators
  • 2.155 Mensaje(s)
  • Location:Tratando de buscar el anillo, y mi destino final

Publicado el 23 mayo 2008 - 02:00

Muy buen aporte Ge.Pe, en tu linea icon_wink.gif

A propósito de esto, recomiendo 100% la visita a la exposición "Bodies" en Santiago, que creo que está desde el 24 de Marzo en Chile.

Tuve la oportunidad de estar allí, y sirve para profundizar todos estos temas, y verlos en vivo, con cuerpos donados que han sido especialmente "sellados" para la exposición. Pueden encontrar desde los músculos del cuerpo, pasando por tocar cerebros, etc., hasta el sistema circulatorio de un ser humano

Saludos icon_wink.gif

Cuando descubras la naturaleza del ser humano, te darás cuenta de lo básico que somos...


#26 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 28 mayo 2008 - 06:43







CITA(Baryonix @ May 23 2008, 01:00 PM) Ver Mensajes
Muy buen aporte Ge.Pe, en tu linea icon_wink.gif

A propósito de esto, recomiendo 100% la visita a la exposición "Bodies" en Santiago, que creo que está desde el 24 de Marzo en Chile.

Tuve la oportunidad de estar allí, y sirve para profundizar todos estos temas, y verlos en vivo, con cuerpos donados que han sido especialmente "sellados" para la exposición. Pueden encontrar desde los músculos del cuerpo, pasando por tocar cerebros, etc., hasta el sistema circulatorio de un ser humano

Saludos icon_wink.gif



Gracias por tus palabras Baryonix y gracias por tu sugerencia, creo que muchos seguirán tu consejo.



____________________________________________________________


smile_031.gif




Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________


Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.



VII. The Veins


Introduction


THE VEINS convey the blood from the capillaries of the different parts of the body to the heart. They consist of two distinct sets of vessels, the pulmonary and systemic.

The Pulmonary Veins, unlike other veins, contain arterial blood, which they return from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.

The Systemic Veins return the venous blood from the body generally to the right atrium of the heart.


The Portal Vein, an appendage to the systemic venous system, is confined to the abdominal cavity, and returns the venous blood from the spleen and the viscera of digestion to the liver. This vessel ramifies in the substance of the liver and there breaks up into a minute network of capillary-like vessels, from which the blood is conveyed by the hepatic veins to the inferior vena cava.

The veins commence by minute plexuses which receive the blood from the capillaries. The branches arising from these plexuses unite together into trunks, and these, in their passage toward the heart, constantly increase in size as they receive tributaries, or join other veins. The veins are larger and altogether more numerous than the arteries; hence, the entire capacity of the venous system is much greater than that of the arterial; the capacity of the pulmonary veins, however, only slightly exceeds that of the pulmonary arteries. The veins are cylindrical like the arteries; their walls, however, are thin and they collapse when the vessels are empty, and the uniformity of their surfaces is interrupted at intervals by slight constrictions, which indicate the existence of valves in their interior. They communicate very freely with one another, especially in certain regions of the body; and these communications exist between the larger trunks as well as between the smaller branches. Thus, between the venous sinuses of the cranium, and between the veins of the neck, where obstruction would be attended with imminent danger to the cerebral venous system, large and frequent anastomoses are found. The same free communication exists between the veins throughout the whole extent of the vertebral canal, and between the veins composing the various venous plexuses in the abdomen and pelvis, e. g., the spermatic, uterine, vesical, and pudendal.


The systemic venous channels are subdivided into three sets, viz., superficial and deep veins, and venous sinuses.


The Superficial Veins (cutaneous veins) are found between the layers of the superficial fascia immediately beneath the skin; they return the blood from these structures, and communicate with the deep veins by perforating the deep fascia.


The Deep Veins accompany the arteries, and are usually enclosed in the same sheaths with those vessels. With the smaller arteries—as the radial, unlar, brachial, tibial, peroneal—they exist generally in pairs, one lying on each side of the vessel, and are called venæ comitantes. The larger arteries—such as the axillary, subclavian, popliteal, and femoral—have usually only one accompanying vein. In certain organs of the body, however, the deep veins do not accompany the arteries; for instance, the veins in the skull and vertebral canal, the hepatic veins in the liver, and the larger veins returning blood from the bones.


Venous Sinuses are found only in the interior of the skull, and consist of canals formed by a separation of the two layers of the dura mater; their outer coat consists of fibrous tissue, their inner of an endothelial layer continuous with the lining membrane of the veins.



2. The Pulmonary Veins

(Venæ Pulmonales)



The pulmonary veins return the arterialized blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart. They are four in number, two from each lung, and are destitute of valves. The commence in a capillary net-work upon the walls of the air sacs, where they are continuous with the capillary ramifications of the pulmonary artery, and, joining together, form one vessel for each lobule.


FIG. 971



Pulmonary vessels, seen in a dorsal view of the heart and lungs. The lungs have been pulled away from the median line, and a part of the right lung has been cut away to display the air-ducts and bloodvessels. (Testut.)




3. The Systemic Veins


The systemic veins may be arranged into three groups: (1) The veins of the heart. (2) The veins of the upper extremities, head, neck, and thorax, which end in the superior vena cava. (3) The veins of the lower extremities, abdomen, and pelvis, which end in the inferior vena cava.


a. The Veins of the Heart

Coronary Sinus (sinus coronarius).—
(VV. Cordis)



—Most of the veins of the heart (Fig. 556) open into the coronary sinus. This is a wide venous channel about 2.25 cm. in length situated in the posterior part of the coronary sulcus, and covered by muscular fibers from the left atrium. It ends in the right atrium between the opening of the inferior vena cava and the atrioventricular aperture, its orifice being guarded by a semilunar valve, the valve of the coronary sinus (valve of Thebesius).



FIG. 556




Base and diaphragmatic surface of heart.





3b. The Veins of the Head and Neck


The veins of the head and neck may be subdivided into three groups: (1) The veins of the exterior of the head and face. (2) The veins of the neck. (3) The diploic veins, the veins of the brain, and the venous sinuses of the dura mater.


1. The Veins of the Exterior of the Head and Face—The veins of the exterior of the head and face (Fig. 557) are:

Frontal.
Superficial Temporal.
Supraorbital.
Internal Maxillary.
Angular.
Posterior Facial.
Anterior Facial.
Posterior Auricular.
Occipital.



FIG. 557




Veins of the head and neck.




3b. 2. The Veins of the Neck


The veins of the neck (Fig. 558), which return the blood from the head and face, are:

External Jugular.
Anterior Jugular.
Posterior External Jugular.
Internal Jugular.
Vertebral.



FIG. 558




The veins of the neck, viewed from in front. (Spalteholz.)





FIG. 559




Veins of the tongue. The hypoglossal nerve has been displaced downward in this preparation. (Testut after Hirschfeld.)




FIG. 560




The veins of the thyroid gland.





FIG. 561




Diagram showing common arrangement of thyroid veins. (Kocher.)





FIG. 562




The fascia and middle thyroid veins. The veins here designated the inferior thyroid are called by Kocher the thyroidea ima. (Poirier and Charpy.)




FIG. 563




The vertebral vein. (Poirier and Charpy.)





3b. 3. The Diploic Veins

(Venæ Diploicæ)



The diploic veins (Fig. 564) occupy channels in the diploë of the cranial bones. They are large and exhibit at irregular intervals pouch-like dilatations; their walls are thin, and formed of endothelium resting upon a layer of elastic tissue.



FIG. 564





They consist of

(1) the frontal, which opens into the supraorbital vein and the superior sagittal sinus;

(2) the anterior temporal, which is confined chiefly to the frontal bone, and opens into the sphenoparietal sinus and into one of the deep temporal veins, through an aperture in the great wing of the sphenoid;

(3) the posterior temporal, which is situated in the parietal bone, and ends in the transverse sinus, through an aperture at the mastoid angle of the parietal bone or through the mastoid foramen; and

(4) the occipital, the largest of the four, which is confined to the occipital bone, and opens either externally into the occipital vein, or internally into the transverse sinus or into the confluence of the sinuses (torcular Herophili).

Veins of the diploë as displayed by the removal of the outer table of the skull.



______________________________________________________






#27 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 29 mayo 2008 - 08:14




Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________


Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.



VII. The Veins




3b. 5. The Sinuses of the Dura Mater

(Sinus Duræ Matris). Ophthalmic Veins and Emissary Veins



The sinuses of the dura mater are venous channels which drain the blood from the brain; they are devoid of valves, and are situated between the two layers of the dura mater and lined by endothelium continuous with that which lines the veins.

They may be divided into two groups:
(1) a postero-superior, at the upper and back part of the skull, and
(2) an antero-inferior, at the base of the skull.

The postero-superior group comprises the
Superior Sagittal.
Straight.
Inferior Sagittal.
Two Transverse.
Occipital.



The superior sagittal sinus (sinus sagittalis superior; superior longitudinal sinus) (Figs. 566, 567) occupies the attached or convex margin of the falx cerebri.


FIG. 566




Superior sagittal sinus laid open after remova of the skull cap. The chordæ Willisii are clearly seen. The venous lacunæ are also well shown; from two of them probes are passed into the superior sagittal sinus. (Poirier and Charpy.)




FIG. 567




Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain.




FIG. 568




Sagittal section of the skull, showing the sinuses of the dura.



The inferior sagittal sinus (sinus sagittalis inferior; inferior longitudinal sinus) (Fig. 567) is contained in the posterior half or two-thirds of the free margin of the falx cerebri.


The straight sinus (sinus rectus; tentorial sinus) (Figs. 567, 569) is situated at the line of junction of the falx cerebri with the tentorium cerebelli.



FIG. 567




Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain.




FIG. 569




Tentorium cerebelli from above




______________________________________________________







#28 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 31 mayo 2008 - 05:54






smile_031.gif



Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________


Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.



VII. The Veins




3b. 5. The Sinuses of the Dura Mater

(Sinus Duræ Matris). Ophthalmic Veins and Emissary Veins



The transverse sinuses (sinus transversus; lateral sinuses) (Figs. 569, 570) are of large size and begin at the internal occipital protuberance; one, generally the right, being the direct continuation of the superior sagittal sinus, the other of the straight sinus.


FIG. 569




Tentorium cerebelli from above.







The occipital sinus (sinus occipitalis) (Fig. 570) is the smallest of the cranial sinuses.

FIG. 570





The sinuses at the base of the skull.






The Confluence of the Sinuses (confluens sinuum; torcular Herophili) is the term applied to the dilated extremity of the superior sagittal sinus. It is of irregular form, and is lodged on one side (generally the right) of the internal occipital protuberance. From it the transverse sinus of the same side is derived. It receives also the blood from the occipital sinus, and is connected across the middle line with the commencement of the transverse sinus of the opposite side.

The antero-inferior group of sinuses comprises the

Two Cavernous.
Two Superior Petrosal.
Two Intercavernous
Two Inferior Petrosal.
Basilar Plexus.


The cavernous sinuses (sinus cavernosus) (Figs. 570, 571) are so named because they present a reticulated structure, due to their being traversed by numerous interlacing filaments.




FIG. 570





The sinuses at the base of the skull.





FIG. 571





Oblique section through the cavernous sinus.





The ophthalmic veins (Fig. 572), two in number, superior and inferior, are devoid of valves.


FIG. 572



Veins of orbit. (Poirier and Charpy.)




______________________________________________________________





#29 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 01 junio 2008 - 08:53






smile_031.gif



Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________


Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.



VII. The Veins


3c. The Veins of the Upper Extremity and Thorax



The veins of the upper extremity are divided into two sets, superficial and deep; the two sets anastomose frequently with each other. The superficial veins are placed immediately beneath the integument between the two layers of superficial fascia. The deep veins accompany the arteries, and constitute the venæ comitantes of those vessels. Both sets are provided with valves, which are more numerous in the deep than in the superficial veins.


The Superficial Veins of the Upper Extremity


The superficial veins of the upper extremity are the digital, metacarpal, cephalic, basilic, median.


Digital Veins.—


The dorsal digital veins pass along the sides of the fingers and are joined to one another by oblique communicating branches. Those from the adjacent sides of the fingers unite to form three dorsal metacarpal veins (Fig. 573).



FIG. 573




The veins on the dorsum of the hand. (Bourgery.)





The cephalic vein (Fig. 574) begins in the radial part of the dorsal venous net-work and winds upward around the radial border of the forearm, receiving tributaries from both surfaces.



FIG. 574




The superficial veins of the upper extremity.





The Deep Veins of the Upper Extremity


The deep veins follow the course of the arteries, forming their venæ comitantes. They are generally arranged in pairs, and are situated one on either side of the corresponding artery, and connected at intervals by short transverse branches.


FIG. 575




The deep veins of the upper extremity. (Bourgery.)





FIG. 576




The veins of the right axilla, viewed from in front. (Spalteholz.)





The Veins of the Thorax (Fig. 577)


The innominate veins (vv. anonymæ; brachiocephalic veins) are two large trunks, placed one on either side of the root of the neck, and formed by the union of the internal jugular and subclavian veins of the corresponding side; they are devoid of valves.


FIG. 577




The venæ cavæ and azygos veins, with their tributaries.





The Veins of the Vertebral Column (Figs. 578, 579)



The veins which drain the blood from the vertebral column, the neighboring muscles, and the meninges of the medulla spinalis form intricate plexuses extending along the entire length of the column; these plexuses may be divided into two groups, external and internal, according to their positions inside or outside the vertebral canal. The plexuses of the two groups anastomose freely with each other and end in the intervertebral veins.




FIG. 578




Transverse section of a thoracic vertebra, showing the vertebral venous plexuses.





FIG. 579




Median sagittal section of two thoracic vertebræ, showing the vertebral venous plexuses.




______________________________________________________








#30 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 03 junio 2008 - 11:03






smile_031.gif


Completando, ampliando, resumiendo y repitiendo conceptos...


___________________________________________________________


Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.



VII. The Veins



3d. The Veins of the Lower Extremity, Abdomen, and Pelvis


The veins of the lower extremity are subdivided, like those of the upper, into two sets, superficial and deep; the superficial veins are placed beneath the integument between the two layers of superficial fascia; the deep veins accompany the arteries. Both sets of veins are provided with valves, which are more numerous in the deep than in the superficial set. Valves are also more numerous in the veins of the lower than in those of the upper limb.

The Superficial Veins of the Lower Extremity


The great saphenous vein (v. saphena magna; internal or long saphenous vein) (Fig. 581), the longest vein in the body, begins in the medial marginal vein of the dorsum of the foot and ends in the femoral vein about 3 cm. below the inguinal ligament.


Near the fossa ovalis (Fig. 580) it is joined by the superficial epigastric, superficial iliac circumflex, and superficial external pudendal veins. A vein, named the thoracoepigastric, runs along the lateral aspect of the trunk between the superficial epigastric vein below and the lateral thoracic vein above and establishes an important communication between the femoral and axillary veins.



FIG. 580





The great saphenous vein and its tributaries at the fossa ovalis.




FIG. 581




The great saphenous vein and its tributaries.



The small saphenous vein (v. saphena parva; external or short saphenous vein) (Fig. 582) begins behind the lateral malleolus as a continuation of the lateral marginal vein; it first ascends along the lateral margin of the tendocalcaneus, and then crosses it to reach the middle of the back of the leg.


FIG. 582




The small saphenous vein.



The Popliteal Vein (v. poplitea) (Fig. 583) is formed by the junction of the anterior and posterior tibial veins at the lower border of the Popliteus; it ascends through the popliteal fossa to the aperture in the Adductor magnus, where it becomes the femoral vein.


FIG. 583




The popliteal vein.



The femoral vein (v. femoralis) accompanies the femoral artery through the upper two-thirds of the thigh. In the lower part of its course it lies lateral to the artery; higher up, it is behind it; and at the inguinal ligament, it lies on its medial side, and on the same plane. It receives numerous muscular tributaries, and about 4 cm. below the inguinal ligament is joined by the v. profunda femoris; near its termination it is joined by the great saphenous vein. The valves in the femoral vein are three in number.


FIG. 584




The femoral vein and its tributaries. (Poirier and Charpy.)




The Veins of the Abdomen and Pelvis (Figs. 585, 586, 587)




FIG. 585




The veins of the right half of the male pelvis. (Spalteholz).



FIG. 586




The iliac veins. (Poirier and Charpy.)




FIG. 587




Scheme of the anastomosis of the veins of the rectum. (Poirier and Charpy.)



The pudendal plexus (plexus pudendalis; vesicoprostatic plexus) lies behind the arcuate public ligament and the lower part of the symphysis pubis, and in front of the bladder and prostate.




FIG. 588




The penis in transverse section, showing the bloodvessels. (Testut.)




FIG. 589




Vessels of the uterus and its appendages, rear view. (Testut.)

__________________________________________________




#31 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 03 junio 2008 - 11:05






Continuación del post superior....


____________________________




The inferior vena cava (v. cava inferior) (Fig. 577), returns to the heart the blood from the parts below the diaphragm.


FIG. 577




The venæ cavæ and azygos veins, with their tributaries.







The Spermatic Veins (vv. spermaticæ) (Fig. 590) emerge from the back of the testis, and receive tributaries from the epididymis; they unite and form a convoluted plexus, called the pampiniform plexus, which constitutes the greater mass of the spermatic cord; the vessels composing this plexus are very numerous, and ascend along the cord, in front of the ductus deferens.


FIG. 590




Spermatic veins. (Testut.)




The portal system (Fig. 591) includes all the veins which drain the blood from the abdominal part of the digestive tube (with the exception of the lower part of the rectum) and from the spleen, pancreas, and gall-bladder. From these viscera the blood is conveyed to the liver by the portal vein. In the liver this vein ramifies like an artery and ends in capillary-like vessels termed sinusoids, from which the blood is conveyed to the inferior vena cava by the hepatic veins. From this it will be seen that the blood of the portal system passes through two sets of minute vessels, viz., (a) the capillaries of the digestive tube, spleen, pancreas, and gall-bladder; and (b) the sinusoids of the liver. In the adult the portal vein and its tributaries are destitute of valves; in the fetus and for a short time after birth valves can be demonstrated in the tributaries of the portal vein; as a rule they soon atrophy and disappear, but in some subjects they persist in a degenerate form.

The portal vein (vena portæ) is about 8 cm. in length, and is formed at the level of the second lumbar vertebra by the junction of the superior mesenteric and lienal veins, the union of these veins taking place in front of the inferior vena cava and behind the neck of the pancreas.


FIG. 591




The portal vein and its tributaries.



__________________________________________________________





#32 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 24 septiembre 2008 - 05:00





smile_031.gif

Apuntes....


________________________________________


Ciclo cardíaco.


La sístole cardíaca es el período del ciclo cardíaco en el que el ventrículo se contrae, por tanto ocurre desde que se cierran las válvulas aurículoventriculares (primer tono cardíaco) hasta que lo hacen las sigmoideas (segundo tono); durante este período tiene lugar la eyección ventricular.

Desde que se cierran las válvulas aurículoventriculares hasta que se abren las sigmoideas, el volumen de sangre intraventricular no varía (período de contracción isovolumétrica) Cuando la presión intraventricular supera la presión de la aorta y la arteria pulmonar, se abren respectivamente las válvulas aórtica y pulmonar y comienza el período de eyección ventricular, que en principio es muy rápida y luego algo más lenta. En condiciones normales, la válvula aórtica se abre después y se cierra antes que la pulmonar.

La diástole ventricular es el periodo de relajación durante el cual tiene lugar el llenado ventricular.

Cuando la presión en la aorta y en la arteria pulmonar supera la intraventricular (pues los ventrículos se relajan y disminuye la presión en su interior), se cierran las válvulas aórtica y pulmonar respectivamente. Desde que se cierran las válvulas sigmoideas hasta que se abren las aurículoventriculares, el volumen de sangre de los ventrículos no varía (período de relajación isovolumétrica). Cuando la presión intraventricular se hace inferior a la auricular, se abre la válvula aurículoventricular correspondiente, y comienza el llenado ventricular: una primera fase de llenado rápido, seguido por una fase de llenado lento (diastasis), y al final se produce la sístole auricular que produce el llenado de la contracción auricular, ausente en la fibrilación auricular.

Cuando aumenta la frecuencia cardíaca, disminuye mucho más el tiempo de diástole que el de sístole, por lo que las enfermedades con disminución de la distensibilidad o compliance ventricular toleran peor las taquicardias.







_____________________________________________






#33 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 07 noviembre 2008 - 05:05


Reforzando...


Un aporte del Cuarto Blanco.


Biblioteca Web

__________________________________________

 

 

En el transcurso del proceso evolutivo aparecieron animales con una mayor complejidad estructural y un mayor tamaño, y con mayores necesidades energéticas. Entre esos animales, fueron favorecidos los que adquirieron órganos especializados en la captación de oxígeno -como las branquias y pulmones- y un tejido conectivo fluido -en el caso de los vertebrados, la sangre- capaz de transportarlo hasta las células.

En la actualidad coexisten organismos de una gran diversidad de sistemas cardiovasculares. Básicamente, todos consisten en una red de conductos por los que circula un fluido - como la sangre- y una o varias bombas -como el corazón- capaces de generar el trabajo necesario para esta circulación.

La sangre es la encargada del transporte del oxígeno, los nutrientes y otras moléculas esenciales, así como los productos de desecho. Ésta se compone de plasma, eritrocitos, leucocitos y plaquetas. El plasma, la parte fluida de la sangre, es una solución acuosa en la que están disueltos y suspendidos nutrientes, productos de desechos, sales capaces de regular el pH sanguíneo, anticuerpos, hormonas, proteínas plasmáticas y otras sustancias.

En los vertebrados, la sangre circula a través de un circuito cerrado de vasos sanguíneos: arterias, arteriolas, capilares, vénulas y venas. Esta red, que incluye tanto al circuito pulmonar como al sistémico, finalmente alcanza a cada célula del cuerpo. La función principal del sistema circulatorio es llevada a cabo en los capilares, donde se intercambian sustancias entre la sangre y el fluido intersticial que rodea a las células individuales del cuerpo.

La sangre fluye a través del organismo por el sistema vascular gracias a la existencia de un órgano capaz de generar la fuerza necesaria para impulsarla: el corazón. Los cambios evolutivos en la estructura del corazón de los vertebrados pueden relacionarse globalmente con cambios en las tasas metabólicas y en el nivel de actividad de los animales.

El corazón no es solamente un órgano que bombea sangre; también es capaz de secretar sustancias que regulan su propio funcionamiento.

En el esquema general del sistema cardiovascular, la sangre circula desde el corazón a través de vasos cada vez más pequeños, desde donde va pasando nuevamente a vasos de mayor tamaño hasta retornar al corazón. Existen dos circuitos principales en el sistema cardiovascular de un vertebrado que respira aire: el circuito pulmonar y el circuito sistémico. En los mamíferos y las aves, la tabicación completa entre el "corazón izquierdo y el derecho" tiene una consecuencia importante: las presiones sanguíneas pueden ser diferentes en ambos circuitos.

En el sistema circulatorio, el gasto cardíaco genera la presión sanguínea, que es una medida de la fuerza por unidad de área que la sangre ejerce sobre las paredes de los vasos sanguíneos. La presión sanguínea no sólo depende del gasto cardíaco, que genera un flujo de sangre en el sistema vascular, sino también de la resistencia que el sistema opone al paso de la sangre. Esta resistencia está gobernada, en gran medida, por el radio de las arteriolas, elemento clave en la regulación de la presión arterial.

La actividad del sistema nervioso autónomo que controla la musculatura lisa de las arteriolas, al igual que la que regula el ritmo y la fuerza del latido cardíaco, está regulada por un área de la médula llamada centro de regulación cardiovascular.

El sistema linfático se encarga de recolectar el líquido intersticial remanente del filtrado desde los capilares hacia la luz de los vasos sanguíneos. El líquido plasmático ingresa por filtración desde los capilares hacia el intersticio, y pasa desde el instersticio hacia la luz de los vasos por efecto de la presión oncótica. El líquido intesticial remanente que no se recupera por acción de la presión oncótica es devuelto a la circulación por medio del sistema linfático, que lo recolecta y vuelca en el sistema venoso.

 

Diversidad de los sistemas cardiovasculares

 

Los sistemas cardiovasculares consisten, básicamente, en una red de conductos por los que circula un fluido -en algunos casos la sangre- y una o varias bombas que impulsan esta circulación -como el corazón-. Este esquema, que varía en estructura y complejidad en los diferentes animales, debe asegurar el adecuado aporte de sangre a las distintas partes del organismo.

Las esponjas, cnidarios y nematodos no presentan un sistema vascular anatómicamente diferenciado que transporte sustancias: los gases, nutrientes y sustancias de desecho se intercambian ente las células y el exterior por difusión.

En los moluscos y artrópodos, existe un sistema de vasos conectados con un corazón y el sistema circulatorio es abierto. El sistema circulatorio también puede ser cerrado.

 

 

 

42-3b.jpg

Diversidad de sistemas circulatorios (a)

 

a) Un sistema circulatorio abierto: el de los artrópodos. Consiste en un sistema de vasos conectados con un corazón. Desde los vasos, la sangre se vuelca en los tejidos y se forman "lagunas" abiertas desde las cuales retorna luego al corazón a través de aberturas valvulares.

 

 

 

42-3a.jpg

Diversidad de sistemas circulatorios (b)


 

b) Un sistema circulatorio cerrado: el de los anélidos. La sangre circula por dentro del sistema de vasos longitudinales-uno dorsal y varios ventrales- que corren a lo largo de su cuerpo alargado y que se ramifican en vasos menores y capilares. Es movilizada por cinco pares de "corazones" -áreas musculares de los vasos sanguíneos- que bombean la sangre hacia el vaso ventral. Los vasos más pequeños recogen la sangre de los tejidos y los vierten en el vaso dorsal muscular que la bombea hacia adelante. Existen, además, válvulas que impiden que la sangre retroceda y por lo tanto su recorrido es unidireccional. Este tipo de sistema se encuentra en invertebrados como los erizos de mar y los pulpos, y en todos los vertebrados.

El sistema circulatorio de los vertebrados actuales deriva de un diseño ya estaba presente en los vertebrados ancestrales y que sufrió diversas modificaciones evolutivas asociadas fundamentalmente con el pasaje de la vida acuática a la terrestre. Se encuentra en los vertebrados acuáticos de respiración branquial -ciclóstomos y teleósteos-, en los cefalocordados -anfioxos- y en el embrión de todos los vertebrados.

 

 

42-4.jpg

Esquema simplificado del sistema circulatorio en los embriones de los vertebrados.

 

Una disposición anatómica similar, en los primeros vertebrados, habría dado origen al sistema circulatorio de los vertebrados actuales. Un "corazón" ubicado ventralmente impulsa la sangre hacia la aorta ventral, que se ramifica en seis pares de arcos aórticos a la altura de la faringe, numerados del I al VI. Los arcos aórticos se reunen dorsalmente en dos raíces aórticas que se juntan y forman la aorta dorsal que distribuye la sangre en los tejidos. En los vertebrados acuáticos más primitivos, y en los anfioxos, la capilarización de los arcos aórticos a nivel de las hendiduras branquiales permite la oxigenación de la sangre.

El corazón es un órgano esencialmente formado por tejido muscular y por lo tanto, puede contraerse. Cuando el corazón se contrae, la cavidad que encierra reduce su volumen y, en consecuencia, aumenta la presión de la sangre en su interior, que tiende a salir. Las células musculares del corazón deben contraerse ordenadamente y con una cierta rapidez ante un estímulo. Durante el proceso evolutivo, este conjunto de características aparecen en el músculo cardíaco que bombea en forma eficiente la sangre a través de todo el cuerpo.

 

 

 

La sangre

 

En los vertebrados, la sangre es el fluido que circula a través del cuerpo transportando gases, nutrientes y desechos. Consiste, en un 40%, en células: glóbulos rojos (eritrocitos), glóbulos blancos (leucocitos) y plaquetas. El plasma ocupa el 60% restante. Los eritrocitos no tienen núcleo ni otras organelas; contienen hemoglobina y se especializan en el transporte de oxígeno. La función principal de los leucocitos es la defensa del organismo contra invasores como virus, bacterias y partículas extrañas. Los glóbulos blancos pueden migrar al espacio intersticial y muchos realizan fagocitosis. Las plaquetas provienen de megacariocitos que se encuentran en la médula ósea. Contienen mitocondrias, un retículo endoplasmático liso y numerosos gránulos, donde se acumulan diversas sustancias sintetizadas o no por la plaqueta. Las plaquetas desempeñan un papel esencial al iniciar la coagulación de la sangre y obturar roturas de los vasos sanguíneos. Además, aseguran la reserva y transporte de serotonina producida por células del intestino delgado a través de la sangre producida por células del intestino delgado, así como la secreción de otras sustancias vasoactivas como la histamina. Las plaquetas participan en la cascada de coagulación de la sangre.

Con excepción del oxígeno, la mayoría de las moléculas nutrientes y los productos de desecho son transportados disueltos en el plasma. Además, el plasma contiene proteínas plasmáticas que no son nutrientes ni productos de desecho. Incluyen la albúmina, el fibrinógeno y las globulinas.

La formación de las células de la sangre -o hematopoyesis- se produce tempranamente en el embrión humano, en el hígado y en menor grado en el bazo. Después del nacimiento, todas las células sanguíneas, excepto los linfocitos, se sintetizan sólo en la médula ósea. Todas las células sanguíneas se originan a partir de un tipo único de células totipotenciales que se diferencian.

 

 

 

42-5.jpg

Diferenciación de las células de la sangre.

 

La ruptura de los vasos sanguíneos produce una hemorragia que disminuye el aporte de oxígeno y nutrientes al área afectada. Esto puede causar la necrosis, o muerte de las células, y, en caso de pérdidas de sangre importantes, una caída de la presión sanguínea de graves consecuencias. Tanto en los vertebrados como en los invertebrados, existen mecanismos por los que se obtura la zona dañada, evitándose la pérdida de sangre.

En los invertebrados se produce una contracción muscular de las paredes del cuerpo que facilita el cierre de la herida, mientras que la aglutinación y posterior formación de una placa de células sanguíneas obtura la zona. El proceso de formación de esta placa o coágulo se denomina coagulación. En los mamíferos, cuando un vaso sanguíneo se rompe, los vasos sanguíneos de la zona afectada se contraen y el aporte de sangre se reduce. Este proceso es reforzado por la formación de un coágulo integrado por células y proteínas sanguíneas.

La coagulación de la sangre es un fenómeno complejo, que requiere de plaquetas y de numerosos factores de coagulación presentes normalmente en el torrente sanguíneo, o en las membranas de las plaquetas o de otros tipos celulares. Involucra, en sus etapas finales, moléculas de tromboplastina que convierten a la protrombina en su forma activa, la enzima trombina. La trombina, a su vez, convierte al moléculas de fibrinógeno en fibrina, que se aglutina, formando una red insoluble en la que se "enredan" los glóbulos rojos y las plaquetas. Así se forma un coágulo que luego se contrae, acercando los bordes de la herida.

 

Los vasos sanguíneos

 

En el esquema general del sistema cardiovascular, la sangre es vertida desde el corazón en las arterias grandes, por las que viaja hasta llegar a arterias ramificadas más pequeñas; luego pasa a arterias aun más pequeñas -las arteriolas- y, finalmente, a redes de vasos mucho más pequeños, los capilares. Desde los capilares, la sangre pasa nuevamente a venas pequeñas de mayor diámetro -las vénulas-, luego a venas más grandes y, a través de ellas, retorna al corazón.

Las arterias tienen paredes gruesas, duras y elásticas, que pueden soportar la alta presión de la sangre cuando ésta abandona el corazón. Los capilares tienen paredes formadas sólo por una capa de células. El intercambio de gases, nutrientes y residuos del metabolismo entre la sangre y las células del cuerpo se produce a través de estas delgadas membranas capilares. La sangre de los capilares entra a las vénulas, que se juntan formando las venas. Las venas tienen una luz normalmente mayor que las arterias, y siempre tienen las paredes más delgadas, más fácilmente dilatables, con lo que se minimiza la resistencia al flujo de sangre en su retorno al corazón.

 

 


42-9.jpg

Anatomía de los vasos sanguíneos.

 

En los capilares es donde se produce el intercambio de sustancias entre la sangre y los tejidos. Las paredes de los capilares están formadas por sólo una capa de células, el endotelio. A medida que la sangre se mueve a través del sistema capilar, se produce el intercambio de sustancias entre el plasma y el espacio intersticial: los gases (como el oxígeno y el dióxido de carbono), los iones, las hormonas y las sustancias de bajo peso molecular en general, se intercambian libremente por difusión entre el plasma y los tejidos circundantes. Además, la presión sanguínea permite un pasaje de líquido por filtración de la sangre a través del endotelio. Solamente las proteínas de alto peso molecular no pueden atravesar el endotelio. Las proteínas retenidas en el interior de los vasos ejercen un efecto osmótico denominado presión oncótica. Esta presión genera un movimiento que tiene un sentido opuesto al generado por la presión sanguínea y tiende a hacer ingresar líquido desde los tejidos hacia los capilares.

 

 



42-12.jpg


Relación entre la presión sanguínea y la presión oncótica.

 

a) En los capilares, el balance entre la presión sanguínea y la presión oncótica genera un pasaje de líquido desde el plasma hasta el intersticio y viceversa. Las flechas en linea de puntos indican la diferencia entre las presiones sanguínea y oncótica . La pared del capilar tiene permeabilidad selectiva y la presión sanguínea hace salir el líquido plasmático de los capilares por filtración. Las proteínas plasmáticas de alto peso molecular quedan retenidas en el capilar y generan la presión oncótica, que es constante a lo largo de todo el capilar. La presión sanguínea cae a lo largo del tubo y, cuando se hace menor que la presión oncótica, se produce una inversión del flujo del líquido plasmático, que comienza a reingresar desde el intersticio hacia la luz del capilar. b) Variación de la presión sanguínea en relación con la presión oncótica

Sin las proteínas del plasma, la presión sanguínea en los capilares provocaría una salida de líquido plasmático hacia los tejidos que ninguna fuerza haría reingresar. Las proteínas sanguíneas, entonces, tienen un papel esencial al generar la presión oncótica capaz de retener el plasma dentro del sistema vascular.

 

 

El corazón

 

Los corazones más simples, como los anélidos, son simplemente engrosamientos musculares de los vasos sanguíneos. En el curso de la evolución de los vertebrados, el corazón experimentó algunos cambios que resultaron en adaptaciones estructurales.

 


42-13.jpg

Sistemas circulatorios de los vertebrados.

 

La sangre rica en oxígeno se muestra en rojo y la sangre pobre en oxígeno en azul.

a) En los peces, el corazón tiene sólo una aurícula (A) y un ventrículo (V). La sangre oxigenada en los capilares de las branquias va directamente a los capilares sistémicos sin regresar antes al corazón.

b) En los anfibios, la única aurícula está dividida en dos cámaras separadas. La sangre rica en oxígeno procedente de los pulmones entra en una aurícula, y la sangre pobremente oxigenada que viene de los tejidos entra en la otra. El ventrículo, aunque carece de una división estructural, presenta poca mezcla de sangre. Desde el ventrículo, la sangre oxigenada se vierte en los tejidos y la sangre pobre en oxígeno se vierte en los pulmones.

c) En los reptiles -lagartijas, tortugas y serpientes- el corazón está formado por tres cámaras, dos aurículas y un ventrículo. El ventrículo está parcialmente dividido y el corazón funciona como si tuviera cuatro cámaras, con una mezcla entre las sangres oxigenada y desoxigenada mínima.

d) En las aves y los mamíferos, tanto la aurícula como el ventrículo están divididos en dos cámaras separadas; de hecho, hay dos corazones ("izquierdo" y "derecho"), uno que bombea la sangre pobremente oxigenada hacia los pulmones y el otro que bombea la sangre rica en oxígeno hacia los tejidos del cuerpo.

El corazón de todos los vertebrados presenta válvulas capaces de abrirse o cerrarse, permitiendo o no el paso de sangre según la diferencia de presiones sanguíneas entre las cámaras que separan.

En el corazón humano, las paredes están constituidas predominantemente por músculo cardíaco, formado por miocitos. La sangre que retorna desde los tejidos corporales constituye el llamado retorno venoso que penetra en la aurícula derecha a través de dos grandes venas §, las venas cavas superior e inferior. La sangre que retorna de los pulmones entra en la aurícula izquier-da a través de las venas pulmonares. Las aurículas se dilatan cuando reciben la sangre. Luego, ambas aurículas se contraen simultáneamente, haciendo que la sangre penetre en los ventrículos a través de válvulas abiertas. Luego, los ventrículos se contraen simultáneamente, las válvulas que se encuentran entre las aurículas y los ventrículos se cierran por la presión de la sangre en los ventrículos. El ventrículo derecho impulsa la sangre desoxigenada hacia los pulmones me-diante las arterias pulmonares; el ventrículo izquierdo impulsa la sangre oxi-genada hacia la aorta. Desde la aorta, la sangre se distribuye a los distintos tejidos corporales pero también ingresa, luego de ramificarse, al sistema coronario, que es el circuito vascular que irriga al propio tejido cardíaco.

El corazón presenta contracciones rítmicas, el latido cardíaco. En este latido, todos los miocitos responden a los estímulos nerviosos. El estímulo que origina la contracción cardíaca se origina en células especializadas del propio músculo, el marcapasos.

El latido de un corazón de mamífero está controlado por una región de tejido muscular de la aurícula derecha -el nódulo sinoauricular- que impone el ritmo de la frecuencia cardíaca actuando como un marcapasos. Algunos de los nervios que regulan al corazón tienen sus terminaciones en esta región. La excitación se extiende desde el marcapasos a través de las células musculares de la aurícula; así, ambas aurículas se contraen casi simultáneamente. Cuando la excitación alcanza el nódulo auriculoventricular, sus fibras de conducción pasan el estímulo al haz de His, y se contraen casi simultáneamente los ventrículos. Dado que las fibras del nódulo auriculoventricular conducen el estímulo con relativa lentitud, los ventrículos no se contraen hasta haberse completado el latido auricular.Cuando los impulsos del sistema de conducción viajan a través del corazón y producen su contracción, se genera una corriente eléctrica en su superficie. Esta corriente se transmite a los fluidos corporales y, desde allí, parte de ella alcanza la superficie del cuerpo. Esta corriente puede ser registrada en un electrocardiograma que permite establecer la capacidad del corazón de iniciar y transmitir los impulsos.

En cada latido, el corazón eyecta un determinado volumen de sangre. El volumen total de sangre bombeada por el corazón por minuto se llama gasto cardíaco. El gasto cardíaco se relaciona con el volumen de sangre que el corazón es capaz de movilizar y, por lo tanto, con la cantidad de energía química necesaria para realizar ese trabajo y con el consumo de oxígeno necesario para disponer de esa energía química.

Un cambio del gasto cardíaco puede deberse a cambios de la frecuencia del latido, del volumen de eyección o a ambos. Frente a variaciones en las necesidades orgánicas de aporte sanguíneo a los tejidos (por ejemplo, durante el ejercicio), el gasto cardíaco puede modificarse por acción nerviosa, por acción de hormonas o por un control intrínseco del corazón ligado al retorno venoso.

La regulación nerviosa es ejercida por el sistema nervioso autónomo fundamentalmente a través de la modificación de la frecuencia de latido.

 

 

 


42-17.jpg


Regulación autónoma de la frecuencia de latido cardíaco.

 

Finalmente, el corazón muestra una notable capacidad para autorregular la cantidad de sangre que eyecta, independientemente de factores nerviosos u hormonales.

Las fibras simpáticas estimulan el nódulo sinoauricular, mientras que las fibras parasimpáticas, contenidas en el nervio vago, lo inhiben. Como consecuencia, ante un aumento de la estimulación del sistema nervioso parasimpático, la fecuencia cardíaca disminuye y, ante un aumento de la estimulación del sistema nervioso simpático, la frecuencia cardíaca aumenta.

Los primeros estudios sobre el corazón se centraron en su función de bombeo. Sin embargo el corazón es también un órgano secretor de sustancias -hormonas y enzimas - que regulan su propio funcionamiento y el de otros órganos. Las sustancias secretadas por el corazón pueden tener efectos sobre las mismas células que la producen (acción autocrina), sobre las células vecinas (acción paracrina) o sobre otros órganos (acción endocrina). Estas sustancias incluyen la angiotensina II, un péptido vasoconstrictor que proviene, a su vez, del clivaje de un precursor que cuando circula por la sangre y aumenta la presión sanguínea. Otra sustancia, el óxido nítrico, en el corazón, es sintetizado por las células endoteliales del sistema coronario. Su liberación afecta al músculo liso adyacente generando vasodilatación local, pero también incrementa la relajación del músculo cardíaco al actuar directamente sobre los miocitos vecinos: un claro ejemplo de regulación paracrina. Existe también una proteína, el factor natriurético atrial que se acumula en los miocitos en forma de una prohormona peptídica que, al ser clivada, da lugar a la hormona activa.

En el sistema cardiovascular, como consecuencia del aumento de la diuresis y la natriuresis, el volumen total de sangre disminuye y, por lo tanto, el retorno venoso y la presión arterial caen con lo que el gasto cardíaco se reduce. Estos mecanismos tienden a contrarrestar las causas que llevaron a la liberación de factor natriurético atrial y son un buen ejemplo de un proceso de retroalimentación negativa.

 

 


42-18.jpg

Uno de los mecanismos de acción del factor natriurético atrial.

 

La infusión de una cierta cantidad de suero puede provocar el aumento del retorno venoso al corazón. Como consecuencia, las paredes cardíacas se distienden por un aumento del volumen de sangre contenido en los ventrículos y las aurículas. La fuerza de contracción ventricular se incrementa (Ley de Starling) y también el volumen de eyección. El estiramiento de las paredes auriculares induce la secreción de factor natriurético atrial que viaja por el torrente sanguíneo hasta los riñones, donde provoca un aumento de la diuresis y la natriuresis. Estos dos últimos efectos tienden a disminuir el volumen de sangre y, en consecuencia, el retorno venoso que desencadenó el proceso descripto.

 

El circuito vascular

 

Hay dos circuitos principales en el sistema cardiovascular de un vertebrado que respira aire: el circuito pulmonar y el circuito sistémico. En los mamíferos y las aves, la tabicación completa entre el "corazón izquierdo y el derecho" tiene una consecuencia importante: las presiones sanguíneas pueden ser diferentes en ambos circuitos.

 

 


42-19.jpg

Algunos de los circuitos principales del sistema cardiovascular humano.


 

La sangre oxigenada se muestra en rojo, y la desoxigenada en azul. Las porciones de los pulmones en las cuales ocurre el intercambio gaseoso son irrigadas por la circulación sistémica. La sangre que viaja a través de los capilares provee de oxígeno y de nutrientes a cada célula de estos tejidos y se lleva el dióxido de carbono y otros desechos. En las terminaciones venosas de los lechos capilares la sangre pasa a través de vénulas, luego a venas más grandes y finalmente retorna al corazón a través de las venas cavas superior o inferior.

La sangre es vertida desde el corazón en las arterias grandes, por las que viaja hasta llegar a arterias ramificadas más pequeñas; luego pasa a arterias aun más pequeñas -las arteriolas- y, finalmente, a redes de vasos mucho más pequeños, los capilares. Desde los capilares, la sangre pasa nuevamente a venas pequeñas de mayor diámetro -las vénulas-, luego a venas más grandes y, a través de ellas, retorna al corazón.

El circuito sistémico es mucho más grande. Muchas arterias principales que irrigan diferentes partes del cuerpo se ramifican a partir de la aorta cuando ésta abandona el ventrículo izquierdo. Las primeras dos ramas son las arterias coronarias derecha e izquierda, que llevan sangre oxigenada al propio músculo cardíaco. Otra subdivisión importante de la circulación sistémica irriga el cerebro.

En el corazón humano, la sangre que retorna de la circulación sistémica a través de las venas cavas superior e inferior entra a la aurícula derecha y pasa al ventrículo derecho, que la impulsa a través de las arterias pulmonares hacia los pulmones, donde se oxigena. La sangre de los pulmones entra a la aurícula izquierda a través de las venas pulmonares, pasa al ventrículo izquierdo y luego es bombeada a través de la aorta a los tejidos del cuerpo.

Entre la circulación sistémica se incluyen varios sistemas porta, en los que la sangre fluye a través de dos lechos capilares distintos, conectados "en serie" por venas o por arterias, antes de entrar a las venas que retornan al corazón. Un ejemplo es el sistema porta hepático que permite que los productos de la digestión pueden ser procesados de modo directo por el hígado. Otros sistemas porta desempeñan papeles importantes en el procesamiento químico de la sangre en los riñones y en las funciones de la glándula hipófisis.

 

 

___________________________________
 


 

Se agradece...

____________________________________________________

 


Este tema ha sido editado por Ge. Pe.: 11 junio 2014 - 02:28
Reponer imágenes


#34 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 08 noviembre 2008 - 07:30


Finalizamos el post anterior..


________________________________________



Presión sanguínea

 

Las contracciones de los ventrículos del corazón impulsan la sangre al interior de las arterias con fuerza considerable. La presión sanguínea es una medida de la fuerza por unidad de área con que la sangre empuja las paredes de los vasos sanguíneos.

La presión se genera por la acción de bombeo del corazón y cambia con la frecuencia y la fuerza de contracción. La elasticidad de las paredes arteriales y la resistencia que el sistema opone al paso de la sangre son algunos de los factores que desempeñan también papeles importantes para determinar la presión sanguínea.

El flujo sanguíneo (Q) puede definirse como el volumen de sangre (XV) que pasa por un determinado sector por unidad de tiempo (Xt).

 


Q=(XV / Xt)


En general, si consideramos el paso de un fluido a través de un tubo, se comprueba que Q=P/R donde P es la presión en el sistema y R es la resistencia al paso del fluido, en este caso, la sangre. Esta relación se denomina Ley de Poiselle.

La Ley de Poiselle nos permite deducir que si la presión es nula, no hay flujo sanguíneo. Además, la resistencia R depende, por una parte, de la viscosidad (m) de la sangre y, por otra, del radio ® de los vasos (de acuerdo con la expresión: R=8 x L x m/p x r4). Si consideramos la longitud del sistema cardiovascular L y la viscosidad de la sangre m como constantes, se puede deducir que pequeñas variaciones en el radio de los vasos sanguíneos provocan grandes cambios en R.

Esto es lo que efectivamente ocurre en el árbol vascular, donde el diámetro de las arteriolas que irrigan directamente a los capilares, puede alterarse por acción de los anillos de músculo liso de las paredes de los vasos. Estos músculos lisos reciben la influencia de los nervios autónomos, las hormonas adrenalina y noradrenalina (norepinefrina), y del óxido nítrico producido por el endotelio vascular, del factor natriurético atrial, y de otras hormonas o sustancias producidas localmente en los propios tejidos.

En las distintas partes del árbol vascular la cantidad de sangre contenida, su velocidad y presión son diferentes.

 

 

 


42-20.jpg

Volumen contenido, presión y velocidad de la sangre en cada sector del árbol vascular.

 

En la aorta y en las grandes arterias, las paredes arteriales deben soportar grandes presiones y velocidades. En los capilares, en cambio, las presiones y velocidades son bajas, lo que permite que se equilibren las concentraciones de solutos entre el plasma y el espacio intersticial. Nótese la gran cantidad de sangre contenida en las venas: en ciertas condiciones como el ejercicio, esta cantidad puede disminuir e incrementarse el retorno venoso.

Cuando la sangre fluye a través del circuito vascular, su presión cae gradualmente como consecuencia de la amortiguación causada por el retroceso de las paredes arteriales elásticas y por la resistencia de las arteriolas y capilares. La presión es más elevada en la aorta y en otras arterias sistémicas grandes, mucho menor en las venas, y es la más baja en la aurícula derecha.

Las venas, con sus paredes delgadas y sus diámetros relativamente grandes, ofrecen poca resistencia al flujo, haciendo posible el movimiento de retorno de la sangre al corazón, a pesar de su baja presión. Las válvulas de las venas evitan el reflujo. El regreso de la sangre al corazón (retorno venoso) es intensificado por las contracciones de músculos esqueléticos.

La actividad de los nervios que controlan al músculo liso de los vasos sanguíneos, junto con la actividad nerviosa que regula el ritmo cardíaco y la potencia del latido están coordinadas por el llamado centro de regulación cardiovascular.

Este centro está localizado en el bulbo y controla a los nervios simpáticos y parasimpáticos que van al corazón, así como a los nervios simpáticos de la musculatura lisa de las arteriolas. Este control tiende a mantener en equilibrio los factores que regulan la circulación de la sangre. Los barorreceptores (o presorreceptores) son sensibles al estiramiento que se produce en las paredes de los vasos sanguíneos como consecuencia de las diferentes presiones sanguíneas en su interior. Se encuentran en las arterias carótidas, la aorta, las venas cavas y el corazón. En las mismas áreas que los barorreceptores se ubican también los quimiorreceptores, que son sensibles a cambios en el contenido de oxígeno y dióxido de carbono de la sangre, así como a variaciones en su pH. El centro de regulación cardiovascular recibe e integra información a partir de los dos tipos de receptores y desencadena una respuesta de tipo refleja. Los órganos efectores del reflejo son el corazón y los vasos sanguíneos. Esta respuesta tiende a normalizar las alteraciones de la presión sanguínea así como las de contenido de oxígeno, de dióxido de carbono y de pH e involucra usualmente mecanismos de control por retroalimentación negativa.

 

 

El sistema linfático

 

En condiciones normales, no todo el líquido plasmático filtrado desde los capilares hacia el espacio intersticial vuelve a recuperarse en el sistema venoso por efecto de la presión oncótica. Este excedente de líquido es drenado para retornar al sistema circulatorio. En los vertebrados superiores, los fluidos y algunas proteínas perdidas por la sangre en los tejidos son recolectados por el sistema linfático que los lleva nuevamente al torrente sanguíneo.

El sistema linfático humano está formado por una red de vasos linfáticos y nódulos linfáticos. La linfa reingresa en el torrente sanguíneo a través del conducto torácico, que se vacía en la vena subclavia izquierda y, a través del conducto linfático derecho, que se vacía en la vena subclavia derecha. Estas dos venas se vacían en la vena cava superior.

El sistema linfático tiene algunas similitudes con el sistema venoso, pues consiste en una red interconectada de vasos que son progresivamente más grandes. Los vasos más grandes presentan una capa de músculo liso que les permite contraerse y un sistema de válvulas que asegura el tránsito en un solo sentido del líquido. Los vasos más pequeños no tienen pared muscular y se asemejan a los capilares a través de los cuales circula la sangre.

 

 


42-22.jpg

El sistema linfático humano.


 

Los capilares linfáticos, sin embargo, son conductos ciegos que se abren en el espacio intercelular y no forman parte de un circuito continuo. El fluido intersticial se infiltra en los capilares linfáticos, desde los cuales viaja a conductos más grandes que se vacían en dos venas que a su vez se vacían en la vena cava superior. El fluido llevado en el sistema linfático se conoce como linfa. La concentración iónica de la linfa es similar a la del plasma, pero su concentración en proteínas es menor. En la linfa se transportan al torrente sanguíneo las grasas absorbidas del tubo digestivo.

Algunos vertebrados no mamíferos tienen "corazones linfáticos", capaces de propulsar la linfa. En los mamíferos, la linfa se mueve por la contracción de los vasos linfáticos y por la acción de los músculos del cuerpo.

La cantidad diaria de linfa volcada en el sistema venoso es de 2 a 4 litros, mucho menor que los 7.000 litros diarios que pasan por la circulación sistémica. Sin embargo, esta circulación permite la recuperación de alrededor de 200 gramos diarios de proteínas que, de otra manera, hubieran quedado retenidas en el intersticio.

Los nódulos o ganglios linfáticos, que son una masa de tejido esponjoso, están distribuidos en todo el sistema linfático. Tienen dos funciones: son los sitios de proliferación de los linfocitos, glóbulos blancos especializados que son efectores de la respuesta inmune, y eliminan los restos celulares y las partículas extrañas de la linfa antes de que penetren en la sangre. La remoción de los desechos químicos, sin embargo, requiere del procesamiento de la propia sangre; esta función es desempeñada por los riñones.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________
 


Este tema ha sido editado por Ge. Pe.: 11 junio 2014 - 02:30
Reponer imágenes


#35 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 13 julio 2009 - 05:42

 

 
Interactivos...

En:

Biología, 7ª edición, de Campbell y Reece.


Editorial Médica Panamericana


Sitio para el estudiante

_____________________________



Fichero Adjunto  PathOfBloodFlow_A.swf   184,06K   1225 Número de descargas

Fichero Adjunto  BloodToTissues_A.swf   98,35K   81 Número de descargas

______________________________________________


 


Este tema ha sido editado por Ge. Pe.: 11 junio 2014 - 02:31


#36 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 15 julio 2009 - 08:02

 


Interactivo...

En:

Biología, 7ª edición, de Campbell y Reece.

Editorial Médica Panamericana

Sitio para el estudiante


__________________________________



Fichero Adjunto  CO2TissuesToBlood_A.swf   160,98K   98 Número de descargas


Fichero Adjunto  CO2BloodToLungs_A.swf   123,67K   1206 Número de descargas


Fichero Adjunto  O2LungsToBlood_A.swf   86,95K   89 Número de descargas


_____________________________________________________

 





Este tema ha sido editado por Ge. Pe.: 11 junio 2014 - 02:33


#37 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 15 julio 2009 - 08:02


Interactivo...

En:

Biología, 7ª edición, de Campbell y Reece.

Editorial Médica Panamericana

Sitio para el estudiante


__________________________________



Fichero Adjunto  CO2TissuesToBlood_A.swf   160,98K   98 Número de descargas


Fichero Adjunto  CO2BloodToLungs_A.swf   123,67K   1206 Número de descargas


Fichero Adjunto  O2LungsToBlood_A.swf   86,95K   89 Número de descargas


_____________________________________________________

 





Este tema ha sido editado por Ge. Pe.: 11 junio 2014 - 02:34


#38 Invitado_cati_*

Invitado_cati_*
  • Guests

Publicado el 08 junio 2010 - 07:41

[size="4"]que genial es el sistema circulatorio me sirve para mi tarea de naturaleza :)

#39 Invitado_catalina_*

Invitado_catalina_*
  • Guests

Publicado el 13 junio 2010 - 04:03

que es el plasma sanguíneo y cual es su función?

#40 Ge. Pe.

Ge. Pe.

    God of Forum

  • Administrators
  • 11.420 Mensaje(s)
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Budapest. Hungría

Publicado el 14 junio 2010 - 05:39

que es el plasma sanguíneo y cual es su función?





Estimada Catalina...

otra vez Wikipedia, lo transcribimos textualmente, porque es de muy buen nivel, muy didáctico y adecuado para responder su pregunta.



Plasma sanguíneo   


El plasma sanguíneo es la fracción líquida y acelular de la sangre. Está compuesto por agua el 90% y múltiples sustancias disueltas en ella. De éstas las más abundantes son las proteínas. También contiene glúcidos y lípidos, además de los productos de desecho del metabolismo, como la urea. Es el componente mayoritario de la sangre, puesto que representa aproximadamente el 55% del volumen sanguíneo total. El 45% restante corresponde a los elementos formes (tal magnitud está relacionada con el hematocrito).  El suero, es el remanente del plasma sanguíneo una vez consumidos los factores hemostáticos por la coagulación de la sangre. (También se define como: el suero es el plasma sanguíneo son fibrinógeno)

El plasma es salado arenoso y de color amarillento traslúcido.

Además de transportar los elementos formes mantiene diferentes sustancias en solución, la mayoría de los cuáles son productos del metabolismo celular. La viscosidad del plasma sanguíneo es 1,5 veces la del agua. El plasma es una de las reservas líquidas corporales. El total del líquido corporal (60% del peso corporal, 42 L para un adulto de 70 kg) está distribuido en tres reservas principales: el líquido intracelular (21-25 L), el líquido intersticial (10-13 L) y el plasma (3-4 L). El plasma y el líquido intersticial en conjunto hacen al volumen del líquido extracelular (14-17 L).

Composición    


El plasma es un fluido coloidal de composición compleja que contiene numerosos componentes. Abarca el 55% del volumen sanguíneo. Está compuesto por un 91,5% de agua, además de numerosas sustancias inorgánicas y orgánicas (solutos del plasma), distribuidas de la siguiente forma:



Proteínas plasmáticas (70%)

fibrinógeno (7%) inmunoglobulinas (38%) albúminas (54%) otras proteínas (1%): VLDL, LDL, HDL, protrombina, transferrina...

Metabolitos orgánicos (no electrolíticos) y compuestos de desecho (20%)    


fosfolípidos (280 mg/dL), colesterol (150 mg/dL), triacilgliceroles (125 mg/dL), glucosa (100 mg/dL), urea (15 mg/dL), ácido láctico (10 mg/dL), ácido úrico (3 mg/dL), creatinina (1,5 mg/dL), bilirrubina (0,5 mg/dL) y sales biliares (trazas).


Componentes inorgánicos (10%)

NaCl Bicarbonato Fosfato CaCl2 MgCl2 KCl Na2SO4

Funciones de conjunto de las proteínas plasmáticas

1.- función oncótica manteniendo el volumen plasmático y la volemia. 2.- función tampón o buffer colaborando en la estabilidad del pH sanguíneo. 3.- función reológica por su participación en la viscosidad de la sangre, y por ahí, mínimamente contribuyen con la resistencia vascular periférica y la presión vascular (tensión arterial). 4.- función electroquímica, interviniendo en el equilibrio electroquímico de concentración de iones (Efecto Donnan)

Otros solutos 1,5%

Sales minerales Nutrientes Gases disueltos Sustancias reguladoras Vitaminas Productos de desecho

Origen  



Los componentes del plasma se forman en varias partes del organismo:



* en el hígado se sintetizan todas las proteínas plasmáticas salvo las inmunoglobulinas, que son producto de síntesis de las células plasmáticas.

* las glándulas endocrinas secretan sus hormonas correspondientes hacia la sangre.

* el riñón mantiene constante la concentración de agua y solutos salinos.

* los lípidos son aportados por los colectores linfáticos.

* otras sustancias son introducidas por absorción intestinal.





En:

Portalplaneta


El plasma sanguíneo



Tiene el aspecto de un fluido claro, algo semejante a la clara de huevo, y el 90% está formado de agua. En él se hallan disueltas importantes sales minerales, como el cloruro sódico, el cloruro potásico y sales de calcio, escindidas en sus componentes. Su concentración oscila muy poco para que no se rompa su equilibrio con el líquido que baña los tejidos ni con el intracelular. Gracias a ellas pueden disolverse las proteínas en el plasma, para ser transportadas por la sangre, y la acidez de los líquidos del cuerpo se mantiene dentro de estrechos límites. 



Las proteínas más importantes que se hallan disueltas en el plasma son el fibrinógeno y la protrombina, que intervienen en la coagulación sanguínea; las al búminas, que desempeñan un importante papel en el transporte y para mantener el volumen de plasma, y las globulinas, que son parte del sistema defensivo de nuestro cuerpo. Todas estas proteínas, a excepción de las últimas, se forman en el hígado. 



Además, en el plasma existen todas las sustancias transportadas por la sangre, como las partículas de alimento y los productos que son el resultado del metabolismo, y, como ya hemos mencionado, las hormonas.




___________________________









Spin Palace - Spanish